CASE FATALITY OF ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME (AIDS) AT UNIVERSITY OF PORT HARCOURT TEACHING HOSPITAL (2003 – 2008)

CASE FATALITY OF ACQUIRED IMMUNE DEFICIENCY SYNDROME (AIDS) AT UNIVERSITY OF PORT HARCOURT TEACHING HOSPITAL (2003 – 2008)

ABSTRACT

This study was undertaken to determine the case fatality of AIDS at University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital from 2003-2008. To achieve the purpose of the study, eight research questions were formulated and four hypotheses were postulated, to guide the study. The study adopted the descriptive method utilizing the expost-facto design. The sample for the study consisted of 289 AIDS fatality cases at University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital from 2003 -2008. The data were collected using the researcher-designed AIDS fatality inventory proforma, which was used to gather hospital information concerning AIDS fatality cases. The Data collected were analyzed using percentages for the purpose of answering the research questions, while chi-square (X2 ) statistics was used to test the hypotheses at .05 level of significance. The results of the study revealed that: a total of 289 AIDS fatality cases were recorded from 2003-2008; the overall case fatality rate was  8 deaths per 100 AIDS cases; there was an increased trend in AIDS fatality from 2004-2005, which then declined from 2006-2008; tuberculosis was the leading opportunistic infection that caused AIDS fatality. The result further revealed that there was no difference in the case fatality of AIDS according to gender and location respectively, while there was difference in the case fatality of AIDS according to age and level of education, respectively. The results were exhaustively discussed and recommendations were made among which were that health educators should educate HIV and AIDS patients on the issue of treatment and management of HIV and AIDS. Much of such education can be done in schools, hospitals, communities and work places. Also, there should be constant testing of AIDS patients for tuberculosis, to ensure early detection and treatment of tuberculosis among AIDS patients.