INFLUENCE OF MEDIA BODY MODEL AND OBJECTIFIED BODY CONSCIOUSNESS ON BODY IMAGE OF FEMALE ADOLESCENTS- THE MODERATING ROLE OF SELF-ESTEEM

INFLUENCE OF MEDIA BODY MODEL AND OBJECTIFIED BODY CONSCIOUSNESS ON BODY IMAGE OF FEMALE ADOLESCENTS- THE MODERATING ROLE OF SELF-ESTEEM

ABSTRACT

This study examined the influence of media body model and objectified body consciousness on body image: the moderating role of self-esteem. One hundred and twenty female adolescents aged between 14 and 17 years (M = 15.58 years, SD =1.07 years) participated in the study. Media body model was varied into fat and thin media models. The objectified body consciousness scale (McKinley & Hyde, 1996), body image acceptance and action questionnaire (Sandoz & Wilson, 2006) and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale were the study materials used to measure objectified body consciousness, body image and self-esteem respectively. Moderated regression statistic (MRS) result revealed that the three dimensions of objectified body consciousness-body surveillance and body shame significantly and negatively predicted body image (β= -.82, p<.001), (β= -.53, p<001), and control belief significantly and positively predicted body image (β= – .21, p<.01). Media body model, however, was not a significant predictor of body image (p>.05). Moderated regression analysis showed that self-esteem significantly moderated the relationship between body surveillance and body image (β=-.15, p<.05), and the relationship between control belief and body image (β = -.25, p<.001)The implications and limitations of these findings were discussed and suggestions were made for future studies