JOB DEMANDS AND WORKPLACE AGGRESSION- MODERATING ROLES OF PERCEIVED ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT AND OCCUPATIONAL SELF-EFFICACY AMONG NURSES

JOB DEMANDS AND WORKPLACE AGGRESSION- MODERATING ROLES OF PERCEIVED ORGANISATIONAL SUPPORT AND OCCUPATIONAL SELF-EFFICACY AMONG NURSES

ABSTRACT

The present study examined the moderating roles of perceived organizational support and occupational self-efficacy in the relationship between job demands and workplace aggression. Participants were 224 (34 male and 190 female) nurses who completed self-report measures of job demands, perceived organizational support, occupational self-efficacy, workplace aggression, and demographics. Five hypotheses were tested. Results of the moderated multiple regression showed that job demands significantly and positively predicted workplace aggression, perceived organisational support significantly and negatively predicted workplace aggression, occupational self-efficacy significantly and negatively predicted workplace aggression. There was a significant interaction between job demands and perceived organisational support in predicting workplace aggression, whereas the interaction between job demands and occupational self-efficacy was not significant. Simple slope analysis showed that the positive relationship between job demands and workplace aggression was stronger for nurses with low perceived organisational support as compared to nurses with high perceived organisational support. The findings were discussed and suggestions for future research were offered.