JOB STRESS, NEGATIVE AFFECTIVITY AND TYPE AS BEHAVIOUR AS PREDICTORS OF WORK-TO-FAMILY CONFLICT AMONG UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

JOB STRESS, NEGATIVE AFFECTIVITY AND TYPE AS BEHAVIOUR AS PREDICTORS OF WORK-TO-FAMILY CONFLICT AMONG UNIVERSITY LECTURERS

ABSTRACT

This study investigated job stress, negative affectivity and type A behaviour as predictors of work-to-family conflict among university lecturers. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted while Multiple Regression was used for the data analysis. A total of 385 copies of the questionnaire were distributed among academic staff of the University of Nigeria Nsukka across six Faculties of the University. Out of the 385 copies distributed, 300 copies were returned for analysis. Participants were obtained through systematic sampling. The age of the participants ranged from 29 to 60 years, and they are comprised of 126 male and 174 female participants. Instruments used for data collection were: Work-Family Conflict Scale, Job Stress Measure, Positive and Negative Affectivity Scale (negative affectivity dimension) and Type A behaviour Scale. Finding reveals that job stress has been found to predict work-to-family conflict among university lecturers (Ƃ = .74, p < .001), negative affectivity was found to predict work-to-family conflict among university lecturers (Ƃ = .29, p < .001) and type A behaviour was found to predict work-to-family conflict among university lecturers (Ƃ = .30, p < .001).  In trying to proffer solution to the issue raised from the finding of the study, universities need to create a flexible working schedule for its staff as well as establish a counseling departments in its personnel department to enable employees understand and suggest means of handling conflicts that may arise as they engage in their work that might be traced to the family.