MODERATING ROLE OF EMOTION REGULATION ON RELATIONSHIP OF EVENT CENTRALITY AND POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER SYMPTOMS AMONG INTERNALLY DISPLACED TIV PERSONS

MODERATING ROLE OF EMOTION REGULATION ON RELATIONSHIP OF EVENT CENTRALITY AND POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER SYMPTOMS AMONG INTERNALLY DISPLACED TIV PERSONS

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between trauma centrality, emotion regulation strategies, and PTSD symptoms. It was also aimed at testing the nature of association between event centrality and PTSD could change as a function of emotion regulation strategies (moderation). Participants were 859 internally displaced Tiv persons (male = 434, females = 425), randomly selected from two major temporary camps of the displaced Tiv persons in Markurdi, capital of Benue state: LGEA Primary School, North Bank (Camp 1) and LGEA Primary School (LPS), Wurukum (Camp 2). The average respondent age was 38.81 (SD = 1.94, ranging from 12 to 90 years). They completed the Tiv versions of Centrality of Events Scale, Emotion Regulation Questionnaire and Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. Event centrality positively predicted PTSD symptoms (Beta = .62, t = 22.84, p < .001). Cognitive reappraisal was a negative predictor of PTSD symptoms (Beta = – .30, t = -11.34, p < .001). Expressive suppression was a positive predictor of PTSD symptoms (Beta = -.36, t = -15.16, p < .001). Tests of moderation hypotheses showed that cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression significantly moderated the relationship of event centrality and PTSD symptoms (Beta = -.08, t = -3.37, p < .01; Beta = .09, t = 4.20, p < .01 respectively). The findings underscored recent developments in psychotraumatology indicating that the extent to which individual differences and moderating factors impact the development of PTSD is essential in clinical research and practice.