ORGANIZATIONAL JUSTICE, SELF EFFICACY, AND WORK STATUS AS PREDICTORS OF OCCUPATIONAL STRESS AMONG PRISON WORKERS.

ORGANIZATIONAL JUSTICE, SELF EFFICACY, AND WORK STATUS AS PREDICTORS OF OCCUPATIONAL STRESS AMONG PRISON WORKERS.

ABSTRACT

The study investigated organizational justice, self efficacy and work status as predictors of occupational stress among three hundred and eighty (380) workers of Nigeria prison in Enugu. They consisted of two hundred and twenty six (226) junior and one hundred and fifty four (154) senior aged 18-60 years with a mean age of 39 years. Three instruments were used in the study; Organizational Justice Scale, New General Self efficacy Scale and Role-Based Stress Inventory. Linear regression analysis was used employed to test for significances of the stated hypotheses, which showed a significant effect of the predictors variables, organizational justice (ß= .041, p=NS). Self efficacy (ß = -.103, p<.05) and work status (ß = -.190, p<.001) on occupational stress, the dependent variable. The result of the findings showed that self efficacy and work status were statistically significant predictors of occupational stress among prison workers. Organization stress was not significant. Implications and limitations were discussed and suggestions were made for further study.